Left 4 Dead

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Left 4 Dead review
Rook

Review

Zombie goes to Hollywood

Friendly fire isn’t very friendly (cntd.)


The second mode of multiplayer is versus. In this mode, the player population is split between the four survivors and the boss zombies. In this mode, the players aren’t just out to get each other. The survivors still have to play though a full scene and make it from one safe house to the next. The opposing players are spawned into a random boss zombies and let loose onto the field. A well coordinated team of zombie players is a dangerous thing indeed. After the first team of survivors either gets wiped out or get successfully into the safe house, points are tallied and the roles switch. This goes back and forth throughout the entire campaign to its completion at the finale, where points are totaled and the victors are announced.

Fan-gasim?


Ok, now that I’m done with the fan-gasim, let’s address some of the less desirable facets about L4D. First off, the fact that it is a first person shooter works against the title a little. Point being, no matter how you change the map, or the weapons, or how impressive the graphics are it’s always the same thing. You run around a map and shoot things in the face, over and over and over again. Now some folks really love that and multiplayer does add a great deal of replay value, but with only the original four campaigns available currently, it can get old pretty quick. In Valve's defense, a map making tool is going to be released in a near future. This is on top of unofficial talk of the possibility of expansions.

Another annoyance is that if you are not a fan of Steam there may be some kicking and screaming on your part. Just like every other Valve release, Steam is an integrated part of activation and multiplayer. You can play single player offline, but any multiplayer action takes place through Steam.

Rated ‘M’ for exploding heads


The last thing I feel I need to address is the general content itself in relation to the rating. L4F is an ‘M’ rated game, and parents should be aware of this. L4D has no shortage of zombies, exploding heads, flying severed limbs, blood, gore and the language to match. Though I have to admit, the language isn’t nearly as bad as it could have been, it’s really rather mild in comparison to other “’M’ for language” titles. In addition, multiplayer content will always affect that rating. As a personal example; players are allowed to upload customized logos or “tags” that can appear in-game. During a multiplayer gaming session, a team member made ample use of a very explicit tag he had created that depicted something I can’t even begin to describe in this article Just be aware that online interaction can and will change the game content.

So, in closing, besides those few negative points of limited maps, repetitiveness and rating, L4D is an extremely well done and solid title. When you get down to it, shooting hordes of zombies in the face with an automatic shotgun is nothing but pure old fashioned fun. Add in three other human players together trying to stay alive long enough to get from safe room to safe room while being chased by the above-mentioned horde, you have yourself the making of a great time. L4D has received nothing but awards and praise since its release and for a good reason. If you are a fan of the horror movie zombie genre, or just a hardcore shooter veteran looking for a new flavor, L4D defiantly deserves a spot in your collection.

9.0

fun score

No Pros and Cons at this time