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Pokemon Battle Revolution review

Pokemon Battle Revolution

Pokemon battles with online play. Finally!

Pokemon Battle Revolution


Nintendo recently released Pokemon Battle Revolution for the Wii. Following in the footsteps of its predecessors, the game offers battles in amazing 3D graphics. Pokemon Battle Revolution also offers something the first two Stadium games didn't: online play. With this inclusion, fans thought it would be the best Stadium yet. Were they right? Let's find out!

Battling away


The main aspect of Pokemon Battle Revolution is definitely battling. The fashion in which battles take place is quite simple. Players order their Pokemon to attack, and the battles unfold turn by turn. After every turn, you issue a new order and then you sit back and relax; this is repeated until the battle ends. What has always made Pokemon so deep is the element matching. For instance, say you pit a water Pokemon against a fire Pokemon. The water Pokemon would likely win, since water deals double the damage against fire types (among others). This adds a lot of strategy to battles since you always need to plan a few turns ahead.

Unfortunately, battles can be quite monotonous at times. This is because the battles aren't involving in the least. Yes, you issue commands to your Pokemon, but you feel like a back-seat driver most of the time. Not only that, but the game barely rewards you for your efforts. The only thing that is awarded to you is Poke Coupons which you can use as currency for numerous prizes. However, these prizes only consist of either outfits that you can customize your character with or hidden moves that can already be found in the handheld games. Perhaps the monotony could be broken if you got new arenas or other such unlockables, but the game has none of those.

The need for DS


The biggest flaw in Pokemon Battle Revolution, however, is the fact that the game is completely worthless to those who do not own the DS Pokemon games. At the start of the game, you are offered to use preset Pokemon as your team or you can transfer the Pokemon from your DS game to the Wii. Most people who own the handheld games would decide to import their home-trained Pokemon to give them a better fighting chance. Unfortunately, those who do not own the DS games have to make do with the preset teams. Thing is, these teams are so poorly constructed that you literally have almost no chance of getting through the single-player portion of the game. Oh, and forget about online play. You will be quickly demolished. This could be forgiven if the game let you pick which Pokemon you wanted to use like the previous two Stadium games, but as it is, this system is one of the most inane game ideas ever.

Individuality


On a positive note, the customization is quite extensive. Players can fully outfit their character with different styled glasses, hair, hats, shirts, trousers, you name it. Players can also give their character's distinct catch phrases and introductions. It adds an amazing sense of individual ownership to each player's copy.

Unfortunately, there are also other inane game designs. For example, one arena puts your Pokemon and your opponent's Pokemon on a dart board-esque wheel. The wheel spins around, and player and opponent take turns throwing darts at the wheel. If a dart lands on a Pokemon, it means that Pokemon will be added to the dart thrower's roster for the particular battle. Yes, this means your opponent has the chance to grab all your strongest Pokemon and use them against you while you are stuck with your opponent's extremely weak Pokemon. This is extremely frustrating, and it makes the battles completely unfair and one-sided.
Fun score 5.0

No Pros and Cons at this time

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